How to Speak so People Listen is filled with specific concepts and models. To make a valuable resource for readers, and to introduce non-readers to some of the core concepts of the book, I have created a dictionary. As a bonus, this dictionary also contains additional terms and ideas that are not contained in How to Speak so People Listen. It is in 16 parts and has around 100 entries. If you like dictionaries -�take a look too at The Yes/No Dictionary based on my earlier book, The Yes/No Book.

Part 10: Memory

Memory is important to speakers for two reasons:

  1. You will want to help your listeners remember what you say
  2. You may want to memorise a talk, speech or presentation, for the added impact of speaking without notes

 

Activity (noun); People remember more when they get actively involved in what they are hearing.

Declarative Memory (noun); Memory for things; ‘knowing that’. Semantic (qv) and episodic (qv) memory are two examples.

Episodic Memory (noun); Memory for the events in our lives. An example of declarative memory (qv).

Frequency (noun); People remember more easily when an idea is repeated again and again.

Method of Loci (noun); A memory technique, in which we attach the things to remember to point (loci) on a route or in a familiar seen, such as a room. The Roman Room is an example.

Novelty (noun); People remember more easily when an idea is presented in a novel, unusual or startling way.

Phonological Loop (noun); Mental rehearsal of one or more words or numbers as a part of the retention (qv) process.

Primacy (noun); People are more likely to remember the first person, idea or image they are presented with than most members of a sequence.

Procedural Memory (noun); Memory of how to do things � like riding a bike or boiling an egg.

Recall (noun); One of two memory retrieval (qv) processes, in which we can access the desired information from our memory.

Recency (noun); People are more likely to remember the last person, idea or image they are presented with than most members of a sequence.

Recognition (noun); One of two memory retrieval (qv) processes, in which we can recognise that a piece of information matches what is stored in our memory.

Registration (noun); Brief process of holding an idea, name or number, for example, in our mind, so that we can activate the process of retention (qv).

Retention (noun); Process of transferring something into our long term memory store. The two most often used mechanisms are the phonological loop (qv) and the visuo-spatial sketchpad (qv).

Retrieval (noun); Process of accessing a memory.

Roman Room (noun); An example of the method of loci (qv) where items to be remembered are mentally pegged to places in a familiar room.

Semantic Memory (noun); Memory for ideas and knowledge. An example of declarative memory (qv).

Visuo-spatial Sketchpad (noun); Process of creating of images, imagined objects and using sounds, smells and your other senses, to lock� ideas, names or numbers, for example, into long term memory.

 

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