How to Speak so People Listen is filled with specific concepts and models. To make a valuable resource for readers, and to introduce non-readers to some of the core concepts of the book, I have created a dictionary. As a bonus, this dictionary also contains additional terms and ideas that are not contained in How to Speak so People Listen. It is in 16 parts and has around 100 entries. If you like dictionaries -�take a look too at The Yes/No Dictionary based on my earlier book, The Yes/No Book.

Part 8: Linguistics

We speak in language, so How to Speak so People Listen necessarily introduces some terms from the world of linguistics.


 

Argot (noun); A set of slang or jargon words, shared among members of a group, which creates a barrier to understanding by non-members.

Chronolect (noun); A dialect (qv) characteristic of a single age group.

Dialect (noun); A distinct variety of language -�most often regionally localised..

Ethnolect (noun); A dialect (qv) characteristic of a single ethnic group. In some cultures, there is a distinct ‘men’s language’ and ‘women’s language’ but in most, men and women use a single language in subtly different ways.

Genderlect (noun); A dialect (qv) characteristic of a single gender group.

Idiolect (noun); A dialect (qv) characteristic of a single individual.

Sociolect (noun); A dialect (qv) characteristic of a single social group.

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